Milton Bradley Games make FUN a family affair!

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In addition to television and the TV dinners that we ate while watching our favorite shows, board games were very popular in the 1950s and 1960s. At least one evening a week, families would gather around a table, or they would sit on the floor to play a game together rather than watching what was on the tube. Almost none of those games had an electronic component. The games were designed for specific age groups, so there were some for elementary school youngsters, others for teenagers and even more for adults to play.

Rather than creating new verbiage, I’m taking the liberty of quoting from the same Milton Bradley advertisement as shown in the headline.

“Go-To-The-Head-Of-The-Class” keeps the whole family entertained evening after evening — gives youngsters the big thrill of “stumping” their elders. A sure hit with everyone 10 and over.

Yes, it’s easy to have your whole family looking forward eagerly to evenings at home together — and just as easy to give guests the kind of evening that makes your home the first choice for fun at its best! Modern, fast-moving games exclusive with Milton Bradley are the secret — games that ought to go on your Christmas shopping list right now — at prices from $1.00 to $2.50!

Dozens of games of every kind — action games — “talking” games — games of chance, bear the famous trademark of Milton Bradley, America’s pioneer in games. Every one is a top fun-maker in its class – and they’re ready for you now at your favorite toy, department or variety store. Remember, you’re sure of the best in fun wherever you see this Milton Bradley emblem.

The ad goes on to mention several specific games that had just been introduced as follows:

These modern games set a lively pace

Lobby: Here’s top-level Washington at its hilarious best — a sure hit with everyone old enough to read a newspaper.1950-milton-bradley-board-games-ad-vintage-1

Easy Money: Teenagers and adults alike get an extra thrill when good judgment parlays a lucky chance into a substantial fortune with “Easy Money.”1950-milton-bradley-board-games-ad-vintage-2

Uncle Wiggily: Youngsters from 5 to 10 take a never-failing delight in following the adventures of “Uncle Wiggily” according to the simple directions.1950-milton-bradley-board-games-ad-vintage-3

Game of the States: It’s fun for 8 to 15-year-olds to deliver the goods and sell them for profit from coast to coast in competition with friends in the exciting “Game of the States.”

Finally, here’s a photomontage of some of my favorite games … or at least some of the games that my family owned and played many years ago.

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2 thoughts on “Milton Bradley Games make FUN a family affair!

  1. My mother encouraged the playing of board games at our house. Candyland, Checkers, Monopoly and Battleship were some of the family favorites. Actually, they continue to be the favorite games among our eight grandchildren. Since my mother was a pretty smart “cookie,” she realized that in addition to keeping my siblings and some of our brave friends busy, board games were a passive aggressive way of ridding our souls of built up hostility and anxieties. We were, and continue to be, a “take no prisoners” family (in more ways than one, truthfully). Our Candyland games were not for the faint- hearted. I, personally, would send my favorite 90 year old grandfather straight jail and would hide the “get out of jail free” cards during a night of Monopoly—AND LAUGHED!

    Now that I am older and wiser and have less interest in being aggressive or hostile, I play rather peacefully and calmly. My one confession is that I have “special rules” for some of my youngest grandchildren ’cause I am sweet Granny. I figure it’s up to someone else to teach them “lessons” about life, winning and loosing, etc. under the guise of a game. I like their happy little faces when they win!

    Liked by 1 person

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